12 November 2014

Maximising your internal recruitment opportunities

The concept of internal recruitment is not new, but it’s increasingly on the corporate agenda. The global economy might be (slowly) recovering, but cost concerns remain the new norm. So internal recruitment emerges as a cost-effective, quick way to leverage your existing employee base – without the need for a traditional (and time-consuming and expensive) external recruitment processes.



By looking inside your business – identifying, promoting and developing internal talent – you can help your company grow, meet corporate targets and stimulate innovation and new thinking.

The concept of internal recruitment is not new, but it’s increasingly on the corporate agenda. The global economy might be (slowly) recovering, but cost concerns remain the new norm. So internal recruitment emerges as a cost-effective, quick way to leverage your existing employee base – without the need for a traditional (and time-consuming and expensive) external recruitment processes. But without a clear roadmap for internal talent development, you’re more likely to lose those high performers you think have the potential to take your business forward.

Giving employees a clear career path and developing a culture that actively seeks out and rewards excellent performance is an effective way to implement an internal recruitment strategy.

Internal recruitment helps you:

  • motivate employees
  • retain staff, reduce churn
  • create a positive development culture
  • make operational goals more strategic
  • build an experience culture – managers have a ‘been there, done it’ philosophy that helps them better-manage those reporting into them

Why do it?

It’s all about leveraging your existing employee base to get better at what you do. Scope out talent. Turn that talent into leaders. Innovate and drive forward.

This 2012 talent mobility white paper from Oracle cites research showing a strong link between internal recruitment and corporate performance – the top 10% of firms with “high-performance work systems” had 4 times the amount of sales per employee – and these firms filled more than 60% of roles from within.

Research from the Saratoga Institute shows it costs on average 1.7 times more to hire someone from outside the company than it does internally. And other research suggests that as many as 60% of external hires aren’t successful – compared to only 25% for internal ones.

How to create the right career development path process
For internal recruitment to really succeed, and bring tangible benefits, a robust strategy needs to be in place. Here’s some ideas to get us started.

What can employees do for the company
Develop a culture of employee self-nomination – encourage them to actively seek out career opportunities. Urge them to be proactive, knock on doors and find out what’s going on.

‘Have you ever thought about....?’
Ensure you plot in opportunities to discuss promotion opportunities – at appraisals, say, or during feedback sessions or training days.

Communication, communication, communication
Employees can grow frustrated and disengaged if they feel cut off from what’s going on. If you think the way you advertise new posts could be made more transparent, create a vacancy posting system that is company-wide and consistent.

‘Thank you’
Never underestimate the power of saying thank you (as well as a bottle of Champagne or a $50 dollar bill). Set up a rewards culture so that employees are thanked and recognised for a job well done. Encourage colleagues to nominate each other and look out for examples of good work.

Are you thinking of recruiting from within? Share your experiences with us.

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